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Pumpkin Coffee Cake Recipe

Pumpkin Coffee Cake

TOTAL TIME: Prep: 20 min. Bake: 40 min.
MAKES: 16-20 servings

Ingredients
TOPPING:
• 1/4 cup packed brown sugar
• 1/4 cup sugar
• 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
• 2 tablespoons cold butter
• 1/2 cup chopped pecans

• CAKE:
• 1/2 cup butter, softened
• 1 cup sugar
• 2 eggs
• 1 cup (8 ounces) sour cream
• 1/2 cup canned pumpkin
• 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
• 2 cups all-purpose flour
• 1 teaspoon baking soda
• 1 teaspoon baking powder
• 1/2 teaspoon pumpkin pie spice
• 1/4 teaspoon salt

Nutritional Facts
1 serving (1 slice) equals 209 calories, 10 g fat (5 g saturated fat), 45 mg cholesterol, 184 mg sodium, 26 g carbohydrate, 1 g fiber, 3 g protein.

Directions
1. In a small bowl, combine sugars and cinnamon. Cut in the butter until mixture resembles coarse crumbs. Stir in pecans; set aside. In a bowl, cream butter and sugar. Add eggs, one at a time, beating well after each addition. Combine the sour cream, pumpkin and vanilla; mix well. Combine dry ingredients; add to creamed mixture alternately with sour cream mixture. Beat on low just until blended. Spread the batter into two greased and floured 8-in. round baking pans. Sprinkle with topping. Bake at 325° for 40-50 minutes or until a toothpick inserted near the center comes out clean. Yield: 16-20 servings.

Enjoy your Pumpkin Coffee Cake!

Be sure to visit us at Quiet Walker Lodge where you can Rest, Relax and Rejuvenate. Come Experience the Difference!!!

Our Deer Following

Looking Out the Window

If you watch out your window, or are sitting on one of the decks, you might just see some of these visitors. Rest, Relax, Rejuvenate at Quiet Walker Lodge Bed and Breakfast near Dubuque, IA.

Other visitors include a large variety of birds, squirrels in both grey and black, chipmunks, ground hogs, turkeys and more!

Deer at Quiet Walker Lodge

You never know who may be watching you!

deer at Quiet Walker Lodge B&B

Out for a relaxing walk around the Lodge.

Fox and Sax Indians

Dubuque was first inhabited by mound builders. They built elongated, conical mounds that can be seen at Eagle Point, Pike’s Peak and along highway 52 near John Deere Drive. No one knows fort sure the importance of these mounds. Lucius Langworthy mentioned them in several lectures at the Dubuque Literary and Scientific Institute. He believes they were some type of fortification. However, in later years there is strong evidence that they are mausoleums of the distinguished dead of the race. In 1881, the Smithsonian directed an exploration of the mounds. The most interesting excavation was in East Dubuque. One mound just off Gramercy Street contained a burial vault of 6 adults, 4 children and a baby seated in a dinning circle.

The Mesquakie Indians were known as the Red Earth people. The Sauk, a nearby kin, were called the yellow earth people and their chief was Makataimeshekiakiak known to us as Black Hawk. Both the Mesquakie and Sauk were driven out of their native lands in Montreal by the Iroquois and they landed in  eastern Wisconsin on the Wolf River and then further south on the Fox River. As they continued to be pushed further west by rival tribes,  by 1760 they were in Dubuque. Here they were known as the Fox Indians. They were a small nation of about 50,000. Their language was similar to the Sauk Indians who also occupied the area.

Julien Dubuque came out west with his brother in the early 1780’s. We do not know how Julien became interested in the lead mines. He had come to Praire du Chien to trade with the Indians and maybe the Mesquakie approached him about working the mines. But on September 22, 1788 the Mesquakie gathered with Julien Dubuque and drew up an agreement allowing Julien to work the mines.

As for the Fox and Sax Indians, they were pushed out of their lands to Kansas. But in recent years, they have purchased land in Tama, Iowa and set up their reservation. This year the Mesquakie will celebrate their 100th Pow Wow at their Mesquakie Casino in Iowa. For a much more detailed history of the journey of the Mesquakie Indians to Dubuque, check out the book Dubuque on the Mississippi by William Wilkie.

Gourd Art

Agate Gourd

This weekend, I went to the Midwest Basket and Gourd Convention at Sinsinawa Mounds in Wisconsin. I am now hooked on gourd art! It was difficult to pick the class I enjoyed most, but if I had to pick, I think the Agate Gourd would be my number one choice. This is the one I made.
I learned how to use alcohol ink to produce a marbling effect on the gourd. The grass is a pygmy palm grass from Tucson, Arizona. The beads are Ox bone beads. It took me about three hours from start to finish. I think the fun part was working with the alcohol ink. I plan to make more gourds using this ink and see what kind of designs and marbling effects I can produce.
The second piece I created this weekend was a gourd with natural embellishments. I used a devil’s claw for my centerpiece. I plan to grow this annual to get more devil claws for more projects. The claw can even be used for earrings! The devil claw is also from Arizona and the seeds are inside the top part. On this gourd, I sewed a beautiful red bean that is toxic to animals. So I need to keep this basket high up to stop the cats from eating it and getting high! For this gourd, I used a beautiful red palm grass. I liked the texture and the little nubbles on the grass. Next time I am going to also marble the gourd (possibly in greens).
The next project was learning how to faux a gourd. The gourd was spray-painted black. The first step was to take a glue/sand mixture and put it on the gourd to produce a rough texture. After that was dry, the paint went on and then the seal. I did not like the way this one turned out and plan to experiment more with this technique.
In April, the Wisconsin Gourd Festival will be held in Madison. I hope to make Spirit dolls out of gourds and learn how to burn designs in them. I think I can really get into gourd art and incorporate some of my basket weaving skills for the rims. This is cool!

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