Daily Archives: June 16, 2010

Fish flies

Fish flies cling to a riverfront fence Tuesday in Dubuque.Last June when I arrived in Dubuque, I took a walk along the riverfront. It was there I had my first encounter with fish flies. They were clumped together around the lamps and the sides of the building. I asked my new friend what they were and she said flies that come for about a week and make a mess of the riverfront. It was at that point that I decided to learn a little about these interesting flies.

Today they are back again. What I have learned about them is fascinating. They live for only 24 hours. Their technical name is mayflies and they emerge out of the water during the hot summer months. Mayfly nymphs live in water for anywhere from three to four weeks to two-and-a-half years, depending on the species. While in the water, they live on plant material and attempt to avoid hungry fish, salamanders and even dragonflies. After they hatch, they fly around for about 6 hours. They have no mouths so they do not eat.

After flying around for 6 hours, the males form swarms to excite the females and breeding occurs.

Most females fly upstream before laying their eggs. The eggs, as many as 8,000 from each female, drop to the river bottom. This occurs within about 5 minutes after they have mated. They then fly around for another 6 hours usually close to light like a lamp post. They cling to the post and then die.

I wondered about the purpose of the Mayflies and thought maybe it is to feed the fish. If each female fly deposits 8,000 eggs, I would hope the fish eat most of them because if they all hatched we would have invasion of the Mayflies!

I am glad I do not have to clean up the mess of millions of dead fish flies. They are only found close to the river and never migrate this far into the interior. I have even heard of cars sliding around when there are so many of them on the road. People tell me it is like black ice without the cold. Only in the Midwest!

Visit our website: Quiet Walker Lodge Bed and Breakfast

The Wakatanka House

Dubuque | Country Inn

Wakatanka House

It has been a year and a half that I have been building the Wakatanka House and the work has been challenging, but well worth it. Wakatanka is Great Spirit in the native tongue. As part of Quiet Walker Lodge B&B, we have designed four suites with a Native American theme. On the third floor are the Sedona and Manitou suites. I am partial to the Manitou suite because I love the Pacific Northwest Native arts. This room even has a totem pole!

The other room is designed in the Southwest tradition and has a flavor of the Sedona red rocks. It, like Manitou, has a kitchenette and massive bathroom with a whirlpool tub overlooking the forest. The loft has a gift shop and overlooks the expansive cathedral windows of the great room.

Dubuque Bed and Breakfast

Koi Pond

The second floor includes a solarium with an indoor koi pond. The koi are from Nagata, Japan and love to play under the waterfall. Guests will like the Japanese flair and the lovely orchids. Also the massive deck that faces the forest.

The first floor includes a wine tasting/conference area and two suites; the Santa Fe and Lakota suites. The Lakota suite is ADA accessible and includes a roll in shower for people in wheelchairs.

We hope to open the Wakatanka House up to guests in mid-August. I have learned so much with the building of this home. I appreciate the work done to put it all together. There is so much more to building a house than just putting up walls and a roof. I must have made over a thousand decisions with the construction of it. At times I grew exhausted at the amount of details I needed to balance, but in the end the final project came out as I had hoped. And now we can enjoy the happiness it will bring our guests as they come to unwind and enjoy nature in a unique way.

Visit our website: Quiet Walker Lodge Bed and Breakfast